At last! My errant 13th of 2013. It travelled with me, one-armed, for three months until I sat down and finished the arm in 3 days.

small front

I had envisioned Rosamund’s Cardigan as a big woolly thing, dramatic collar and sweeping curved edges. The twisted reversible cable rib is so delicious… doesn’t it look like piped icing?

small-Piping

I wanted it snuggled against my neck and cosily embracing my wrists.

small-cuff

And of course a big woolly cardigan needs pockets, especially ones edged with a toned down echo of the neck and cuff swirls.

small-pockets

The construction was easy: a top down raglan. I made inseam vertical pockets and just eyed the front curve, decreasing where I felt I should. The cables were worked along with the curved edges until the curve became almost horizontal; at that point, I held the cable stitches separately and finished the stockinette section (after casting on a stich at each edge to use in seaming). Then I added a similar seam stitch on the inner edges of the cable strips and worked them separately, throwing in short rows to force them to curve. (See how there’s no seam when the cables are vertical – right side of pic – and then the seam starts when the cables become horizontal on the left side of the pic?)

small-curve

All done by eye, no great maths involved. Where the strips met I grafted them together (see here for techniques on grafting ribbing; I bound off one side and grafted live stitches to the edge), and then sewed them to the cardigan body using up seam stitches previously created.

 small-graft

Apart from that, I did my usual bust and waist shaping and made it longer than specified. One thing though: I’d added some short rows to raise the back neck, but they turned out to be unnecessary. In fact, they were bunching up so much that I snipped them in the middle, unravelled the short rows, and grafted the live stitches together again for a smooth nape.

As some people may notice, I put the buttonholes on the wrong side. That is, the short front overlaps the longer one instead of vice versa. I realized my mistake after I’d finished most the yoke, but couldn’t be bothered to rip out and start over.

Invisible CO and BO for all edges! See how the ribbing magically flows from WS to RS without a hard edge anywhere!

 small-tubular

Details

Pattern: Rosamund’s Cardigan, Interweave Knits Fall 2009
Yarn: Cascade 220; 100% wool; 201m= 100g; “Blue Sky Heather”; used up almost all of 6 skeins since the ribbed cable eats a lot of yarn.
Needles: 4mm for everything.
Mods: longer, rounded edges, pockets, long sleeves, tubular CO and BO for ribbed edges, more shaping.

small buttoned

Rosamund’s Sweater
Tagged on:         

0 thoughts on “Rosamund’s Sweater

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: